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FOX
Oct 21, 2012 11:00pm PDT
>>> up next on a second look, it brought the united states and the soviet union to the brink of nuclear war 50 years ago. how the cuban missile crisis began and how president kennedy searched for a way to keep from possibly going into war. and how the bay area prepared for the cold war with nuclear missile bases. >> reporter: hello everyone i'm frank somerville and welcome to a second look. 50 years ago tonight the world waited and watched to see if the united states would go into war with russia. a missell took pictures that revealed the soviet had built missile bases. it turned out the missells had already been there for three months. back in 2001, ktvu reporter george watson brought us this look back at those tense days when the united states and the soviet union stood on the brink of nuclear war, each waiting to see if the other would blink. >> a picket line of american warships cruised the waters off the coast of cuba. soviet ships possibly carrying nuclear missiles had been warned to turn back. it was a deadly dance at high noon in the sea. the cuban missile crisis took th
SFGTV2
Oct 3, 2012 8:30am PDT
of many in the united states in the most diverse state in the world's most averse democracy. the delegation will appreciate this as you walk the streets of san francisco at our best as it is across the state. people are living and a dancing together across every conceivable and imaginable difference. i have believed the world looks to us to say it is -- if it is possible to live together across every conceivable difference. we're proud of our home and place in history and proud of our example. but we also are humble in the context of the world we're living in. a world that is another connected but hyper-connected with a merger of i.t. and globalization. we recognize our faith -- fate is connected to the fate of others. that is the spirit that binds us together. the spirit that brings us here today. i want to close by reminding you that california is the birthplace as mayor lee was saying of life science, biotech, the home of the california stem cell institute, a state with more engineers, more scientists, more global -- nobel laureate's than any other state or we still lay claim
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 1:25am EDT
said in an interview, "the united states both economically and mill tarle and also in terms of its overall influence is really is as strong as its ever been." he said this on february 21, 2012. do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it has ever been? >> it depends, david, if you are speaking about strong relative to whom. i think it is true we are still the most emulated in the world. but it is possible to be the world's cleanest dirty shirt. so i sort of america as going back to -- i have to answer this in a little bit of detail. in terms of, one of the things that made us strong to start with, and i would argue, that we actually had a formula for success in this country. one, we educate our people up to and beyond what the technology was, so they can get the most out of it. whether it was universal secondary education, and then it was universal post secondary education. second, we have the world's best infrastructure. roads, railroads, third, we have the world's most immigration policy. so we get the most energy etic and talent
WHUT
Oct 1, 2012 10:00am EDT
nuclear weapons. we begin with the former president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to win but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 11:00pm EDT
and the new united states. to 19, 1812, james madison made an announcement of the first were to be declared in the history of the united states. "i exhorts all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wronged that they exert themselves." and made clear the expectation of showing love of country requires giving support to the war. of a moment of national crisis, patriotism was needed. he fell to justify the conflict to motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority had voted in favor of for not one single member of the federalist party voted to support it. the northeastern federalist took a skeptical view more than seven and western members of the democratic republican party. a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 became of test of the strength and meeting of american patriotism. we tend to forget the word 1812 between the revolutionary independence movement and trans formative carnage of the civil war. the war between 12 has a dubious distinction the first to be decl
SFGTV2
Oct 8, 2012 6:00am PDT
live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations take a loo
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 1:00pm EDT
john roberts who is the chief justice of the united states. he was hired to be a law clerk. john roberts then ended up serving in the ronald reagan administration and in the supreme court in 2005 succeed william rehnquist after he died from thyroid cancer. what is the legacy do you believe? >> guest: i see that john roberts as being rehnquist's natural air. >> now, roberts is a worn just partisan. his methodology is more conservative than william rehnquist, and there has never been it court is conservative, according to the academic studies, there has never been a court that is more conservative right now than the roberts court, at least not since 1987 when records are being analyzed and kept. i think that roberts is very much different in some respects. i'm not sure that rehnquist would've voted as roberts did. i'm not sure that he would voted as part of the affordable care act. >> i was betting against roberts, too. then what would have happened is that somebody else would have stepped up. i think that roberts is different in some ways. he is much more polished in dealing with
WHUT
Oct 30, 2012 6:00pm EDT
>> from portland, oregon, this is "democracy now!" >> in egypt, the united states followed standard operating procedure. standard procedure when one of your favorite dictators gets into trouble. first, the support him as long as possible. but if it becomes really impossible, say the army turns against him, then you send him out to pasture and get the intellectual quest to issue declarations about your love of democracy, then try to restore the bill system as much as possible. >> "who owns the world?" with the presidential election less than two away, we turn to a major new address by noam chomsky on pressing topics not addressed in the president to campaign -- climate change, latin america's break with the united states, the arab spring, and the danger nuclear-weapons already pose in the middle east. >> israel refuses to allow inspections at all, refuses to join the non-proliferation treaty, has hundreds of nuclear weapons, advanced delivery system, and a long record of violence and repression. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war an
CSPAN
Oct 21, 2012 8:00pm EDT
conflict zone, a war zone, in a country where the united states may be very unpopular, people will relate to you as a human being. there will be local cultures of hospitality that take over and effectively protect you. you rely on your fellow human beings to look after you. often, as a foreigner, i am better taken care of by people in many places than if the same people i and interacting with were dealing with locals. >> what was the reaction to you as an american? >> it was ok. people are eager to meet an american, even when they are not happy to meet an american. they are polite. there was an occasion where i went to afghanistan to sit with a man who had been a notorious -- he was accused of being an opium trafficker. there was little doubt. he did not want to talk or see me. but it is afghanistan. i am his guest. he has to offer mitme tea. they spent the whole time complaining about the united states. this was 2002. even though they were very angry, they were going to give mime tea. i was going to walk away and be fine. people respond to you in that way. most people are friendli
CSPAN
Oct 15, 2012 1:00am EDT
for an amount that we decide is due to you. this was the situation. the united states up until that time was seen in iran as a friend of the national movement. iranian nationalism or struggle for them to become masters in their own house to get control of their own destiny started perhaps late in the 19th century or early in the 20th century, and although it united states wasn't a big player in the struggle when we did play we were usually on the right side. there are several famous incidents when the young american teacher by the name of how -- howard was fighting on the side of the constitutionalist and 1910, 1911 president taft sent a treasury team to help the constitutionalists get control of the budget and of the country's finances because the new without that, they were nothing and they had no chance. there was also frustrating. the u.s. was seen as playing a positive role in the azerbaijan crisis in helping iran to restore its sovereignty, territorial integrity. 1953 and what happened with the coup unfortunately changed all of that. one can argue why that happened, how that h
SFGTV2
Oct 1, 2012 6:00am PDT
of the first sewer systems were on the east coast of the united states, often in places that already had developed a citywide water supply system. sullivan: in 1630, boston was basically three mountains, there were very steep hills. waste would run down quickly and dump into the harbor. and the tide would carry most of it away. well, this worked well for a while. the problem was, as boston wanted to expand, it started filling in the mudflats. the water could come rushing down the hill, it would hit the flat area and slow down. at high tide, it couldn't get out at all. it got so bad that the city took over, 'cause the city has a responsibility to protect its citizens. boston built the first modern sewer system in the united states. ours was completed between 1877 and 1884. with this wonderful new sewer system, we were taking our filth and moving it out to the ocean. of course, all of this was untreated. in the 1960s, we were still pumping all of our sewage out to moon island, untreated. we would get swimmers here, never knowing, in the middle of summer, why you would have a cold. well
CSPAN
Oct 27, 2012 8:00am EDT
the new united states. on june 19th of 1812, james madison made a public announcement of the first war ever to be declared in the history of the united states. he said, quote, i exhort all the good people of the united states as they love their country, as they feel wrongs, that they exert themselves. madison's call made clear that the expectation of showing love of country required giving support to the war. at a moment of national crisis patriotism was needed. he sought to justify the conflict to the population at large and motivate the country to support the war. the stakes were high because although a majority in congress had voted in favor of declaring war not one single member of the federalist party had voted in support of the war. northeastern federalists took a very skeptical view of the war, far more so than did southern and western members of the democratic republican party that madison was leading. ostensibly a conflict with britain over national sovereignty, the american war of 1812 very quickly became instead a test or and in addition a test of the strength and meaning of
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2012 9:00am EDT
. most of the major national pollsters do not wait for party identification. in the united states. it's not true in britain but here, here they consider party identification and attitude, not a demographic. they weight for all the standard demographics because the census tells us how many men and women that are in the publishing of how many 18 to 20 euros and those over the age of 55 but by some of the pollsters in the united states are now reading for party invitations they're providing us with two very different pictures of where the election is. those that are waiting for party identification like you, showed no particular pickup for mitt romney after the first debate where as those who did not weight for party identification showed a romney came after the first debate. so very different things going on. as michael just said i would not be surprised if we do not see telephone calls by 2020. a third of households up from 17% in 2084 years ago, cell phones only as michael said, pollsters can't reach those households in the same way. this is a business that has very, very series problem
CNN
Oct 21, 2012 7:00am PDT
final coverage of the debate. fareed zakaria gdp is next for our viewers in the united states. >>> this is gps the global public square. welcome to awe of you around the united states and the world. i'm fareed zakaria. first up, kofi annan. the former secretary-general of the united nations and. i'll ask him whether there's any end in sight for that nation's brutal war, then the u.s. isn't the only major power picking a president for the next few weeks. i'll talk with beijing's reporter e van osnos. also i'll talk to the education innovator sal khan, the founder of khan academy about how best to teach our kids. >>> and what does a company with almost 700 planes and tens of thousands of trucks worry about? fuel. i'll sit down with fedex ceo fred smith to talk about the future of energy. that crucial subject, the future of energy is also at the heart of our latest gps special which airs tonight at 8:00 and 11:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. in global lessons, the roadmap for powering america will take you around the world to bring you ideas about energy back home. >>> but first here's my tak
CNN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00am EDT
controversial leaders. what will your response be? >> some of the behaviors of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising? >> how would you feel if one of your children dates a jew? i asked him about basic human rights of gays. >> do you believe that some are born homosexual? >> i absolutely believe that. >>> mr. president, welcome to new york. many americans see you as public en enny enemy number one. >> translator: good morning to you. i wish to greet all the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your programming at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity towards me don't transfer that to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states. they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protest at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the prophet. as a result there was an take on the american embassy. do you condemn his attack that caused his murder? >> translator: any action that is provocative offe
CBS
Oct 21, 2012 8:00am EDT
>>> welcome to "this week in defense news." i'm vago muradian. the association of the united states army's annual meeting kicks off this week amid pressure to slash spending on conferences. we'll talk about the impact of tighter government travel and conference rules. plus, a look at a compact new realtime facial recognition system that troops can use on the move. but first, the pentagon's new cyber strategy unveiled this month by defense secretary leon panetta makes it clear the u.s. military will take preemptive action if it detects a potential cyber attack that would kill americans or devastate american infrastructure. the aim is to make the threat of counterattack a powerful deterrent. is this the right cyber strategy for america? here with answers is irving la- chow the director of the program on u.s. national security in the information age at the the cent for new american security. irving welcome to the program. >> thank you very much. >> what's the importance of this statement especially at this time? >> i think secretary panetta had two goals in mind in issuing the statement. the
CSPAN
Oct 31, 2012 9:00am EDT
about strategic cooperation with the united states, let alone with israel, and more open to iran's message of foreign policy independence. what policy elites here ms., is the islamic republic does not need governments to be more pro-iranian. that's not what they need. they just need these governments to be less pro-american, less pro-israel and more independent. but you often hear in washington in particular that the arab awakening means that iran is going to see. it's only arab allies. or as candidate romney says, evidently without looking at a map, iran's only outlet to the sea. this reflects how it is american elite's, not those sitting in tehran here in denial about basic political trends in the middle east, let alone basic geography. by the islamic republic does not believe that serious bashar al-assad will be overthrown by syrians, the key point is that even a post a sovereign government would not be pro-american or pro-israel. and it may even be less seen on keeping the order with israel quiet. and unless a post assad government were taliban like, serious foreign policy will
CNN
Oct 7, 2012 9:00pm EDT
of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity toward me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the profit, mohammed. as a result, there was an attack, as you know, on the american embassy in ben zazi and libya. the ambassador, christopher steven, was murdered. do you condemn the attack which caused his murder? >> fundamentally, first of all, any action that is provocative, off fenced the religious thoughts and feelings of any people, we condemn. likewise, we condemn any type of extremism. of course, what took place was ugly. offendering the holy prophet was quiting youly. it has nothing to do with freedom and freedom of speech this is the weaken and the abuse of freedom and in many places it is a crime. it shouldn't take place and
CNN
Oct 8, 2012 12:00am PDT
. >> some of the behaviors of the united states in our region encourages extremism. >> surprising. how would you feel if one of your children dated a jew? and heed, especially when i asked him about basic human rights for gays. >> do you really believe that someone is born homosexual? >> yes, i absolutely believe that an extraordinary hour. piers morgan tonight starts now. mr. president, we will come to new york. to new york. >> the creator, the almighty, the most gracious and the most merciful. good morning to you. i wish to greet all of the wonderful people of the united states and all of the people who will see your program. at the end of the day, if you do have personal animosity toward me, don't transfer that on to the rest of the people of the united states. we love the people of the united states and they also wish in return peace and stability for all of the world. >> the big catalyst for protests at the moment in the middle east was the video that was released which mocked the profit, mohammed. as a result, there was an attack, as you know, on the american embassy in ben zazi
CNN
Oct 8, 2012 8:00am PDT
the republican nominee for the president of the united states. mitt romney is laying out his foreign policy platform in just about 20 minutes from now and we have the live cameras trained at the virginia military institute. will you hear him as he takes to the mic and possibly a global audience. you will hear it here on cnn and from our unmatched team of correspondents and analysts from d.c. to beijing to beirut. we have you completely covered and we'll begin with wolf blitz inner washington. when it comes to foreign policy credibility, the obama camp is comparing mitt romney to chevy chase and our most recent poll shows voters give the president a 7-point edge on world affairs. is a challenger, any challenger, be it mitt romney or anyone else, obliged to do this, obliged to become the commander in chief like more a moment and give a foreign policy speech right before the election? >> yes. mitt romney has been aggressively pursuing the foreign policy area because he thinks the president is vulnerable. yes, the president did manage to kill osama bin laden on his watch, but in
WHUT
Oct 23, 2012 9:30am EDT
is that jesus isn't just for christians in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put jesus on the national agenda andn people of all different religions and without anyt all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began your book with? >> well, presumably it's no because he didn't have anything else to do, i mean, he was a pretty busy guy in the white house but he ordered a couple books from england, a couple bibles and he sat there in the white house and he cut and pasted and took out the miracles and took out the resurrection. he believed jesus was a good guy, he believed he was one of the most important philosophers ever but he didn't like christianity and he was able to separate out christianity from jesu
WHUT
Oct 5, 2012 9:00am EDT
the united states. before i get your answer, we have to praise this administration for getting involved on in the -- involved in the international conversation. we have never done that before. we are part of that conversation, which i think is very positive for us. so, a teacher evaluation. every teacher knows they make a difference in how a child learns. they would not come to work if they did not believe that. the challenge is, how do you assess what they are achieving with kids? what everybody objects to within the profession is you cannot tell if you're doing a good job based on the score on a single test. what a child does on a single test, on a single day does not do justice to the child's learning, first of all, and does not do justice to the teachers trying to move that learning forward. we are all looking for ways to capture that. so it is meaningful. so we know when teachers are doing well. everyone i know who is an adult in their job, the one skill they learned in school they never use again is how to take a bubble test. nobody does that. i have never gone to work an
CSPAN
Oct 13, 2012 7:00am EDT
new york. she not only has the highest approval rating of any member of the u.s. cabinet, she has as well topped a gallup poll as the most admired woman in the world, besting the previous record of eleanor roosevelt who held the title for only 13 years. as america continues to engage in north africa, we have been extremely fortunate to be served by a public servant. clinton engage in these challenges day in and day out and cares deeply about the issues and how they affect america's interests and the leaves in an even brighter future for the people of the middle east. please join me in welcoming secretary of state, the hon. hillary rodham clinton. [applause] >> thank you. thank you all. thank you very much. and a special word of thanks to a friend and someone who i admire greatly, general snowcroft. his many years of distinguished service to our country is a great tribute in every respect. thanks also to john alterman and csis for hosting this conference on maghreb transition and seeking stability in an era of uncertainty. i wish to acknowledge dr. tehrat for his involvement in this important conference and members of the diplomatic corps as well. what are we here? why is this conference so timely? to start with, what happens in this dynamic region has far reaching consequences for our own security and prosperity. we know very well that it is most important to the people of this region whose aspirations and ambition deserve to be met. but recent events have raised questions about what lies ahead, what lies ahead for the region, what lies ahead for the rest of us who have watched with great hope. the events that have unfolded. terrorist attack in benghazi, these and other scenes of anger and violence have understandably led americans to ask what is happening to the promise of the arabs spring and what does this mean for the united states? i certainly think it is important to ask these questions and to seek answers as you are doing today. let me on a personal note start with what happened in benghazi. no one wants to find out exactly what happened more than i do. i have appointed an accountability review board that has already started examining whether our security procedures were appropriate, whether they were properly implemented and what lessons we can and must learn for the future. we are working as thoroughly and expeditiously as possible, knowing that we cannot afford to sacrifice accuracy to speed and of course our government is sparing no effort tracking down the terrorists who perpetrated this attack. and we are focused as we must on what needs to be done to protect our people and our facilities. we had another terrible attack yesterday. i strongly condemn the killing of a long time yemeni employee at our embassy. we are working with yemeni authorities to investigate this and bring those responsible to justice as well but throughout all of this we must not only focus on the headlines. we have to keep in mind the trend lines and remain focused on the broader strategic question posed by democratic transitions and their impact on american interests and values. let me start by stating the obvious. nobody should have ever thought this would be an easy road. i certainly didn't. however, it is important to look at the full picture, to wave of violent acts of a small number of extremists against the aspirations and actions of the region's people and government. that broader view supports rather than discredits the promise of the arab revolution. it reaffirms that instead of letting mobs and extremists speak for entire countries, we should listen to what the elected governments and free citizens are saying. they want more freedom, more justice, more opportunity, not more violence. and they want better relations not only with the united states but with the world. i have no illusions about how complicated this is. american foreign policy has long been shaped by debate over how to balance our interests and security and stability with our values in supporting freedom and democracy. recent revolutions have intensified fees by creating a new birth of freedom, but also by unseating old partners and unleashing unpredictable new forces. as i said last fall at the national democratic institute, we have to be honest that american policies in the region will always reflect the full range of our interests and values, promoting democracy and human rights and defeating al qaeda. defending our allies and partners and also ensuring a secure supply of energy. and there will be times when not all of our interests and values of line. we worked to align them but we do so acknowledging reality. and it is true that we tailor our tactics for promoting democratic change to conditions on the ground in each country. after all, it would be foolish to take a 1-size-fits-all approach regardless of circumstances for historical trends. but in the long run, the enduring cooperation we seek and that our interests and our values demand is difficult to sustain without democratic legitimacy and public consent. weeks before the revolution in egypt began i told arab leaders gathered at dohop that the foundation's regions were sinking into the sand. it was clear even then that the status quo was unsustainable. that refusal to change was itself becoming a threat to stability. for the united states supporting democratic transition is not a matter of idealism. it is a strategic necessity. and we will not return to the false choice between freedom and stability. and we will not pull back our support for the emerging democracies when the going is rough. that would be a costly strategic mistake that would, i believe, undermined both our interests and our values. we recognize that these transitions are not america's to manage and certainly not ours to win or lose, but we have to stand with those who are working every day to strengthen democratic institutions, expand universal rights and drive inclusive economic growth. that will produce more capable partners and more durable security over the long term. today these transitions are entering a phase that must be marked by compromise more than confrontation, by politics more than protests, politics that deliver economic reform and jobs so people can pursue their livelihood and provide for their family. politics that will be competitive and beaten heated but rooted in democratic rules and norms that apply to everyone. islamists and secularists, muslims and christians, conservatives and liberals, parties and candidates of every stripe. everyone must reject violence, terrorism and extremism, abide by the rule of law, support independence, judiciary's and uphold fundamental freedom. upholding the rights and dignity of all citizens, regardless of faith, ethnicity or gender, should be expected. of course, we look to government to let go of power when their time comes, just as the revolutionary libyan transitional national council did this past august, transferring authority to the newly elected legislature, in a ceremony ambassador chris stevens cited as the highlight of his time in the country. achieving genuine democracy and broad base growth will be a long and difficult process. we know that from our own history. 235 years after our own revolution we are still working towards that more perfect union. so one should expect setbacks along the way. times when some will surely ask if it was all worth it. but going back to the way things were in december of 2010 isn't just undesirable, it is impossible. this is the context in which we have to view recent events and shape our approach going forward. and let me explain where that leads us. since this is a conference on maghreb that is where i will focus because that is where the arab revolution started and where an international coalition helped stop a dictator from slaughtering his people, and we're just last month we saw such disturbing violence. but let's look at what is actually happening on the ground, especially in light of recent events. we have to as always be clear eyed about the threat of violent extremists them. the year of democratic transition was never going to drain away reservoirs of radicalism buildup through decades of dictatorship. nor was that be enough time to stand up fully effective and responsible security forces to replace the repressive ones of the past. as we warned from the beginning, there are extremists who seek to exploit periods of instability and hijack these democratic transitions. all the while al qaeda and other terrorist groups are trying to expand their reach from a new strongholds in northern mali, that is not the full story. far from it. the terrorists who attacked our mission in benghazi did not represent the millions of libyan people who want peace and deplore violence. in the days that followed, tens of thousands of libyans ford into the streets to warn ambassador stevens who has been a steadfast champion of their revolution. use of the signs. one read thugs and killers don't represent benghazi or islam. on their own initiative, the people of benghazi overran extremist bases and insisted that militias disarmed and decks of the rule of law. that was as inspiring a sight as any we saw in the revolution ended points to the promise of the arabs spring, by starting down the path of democratic politics. libyans and arabs across the region have firmly rejected the extremists argument that violence and death are the only way to reclaim dignity and achieve justice. in tripoli, the country's transitional leaders condemned the attacks, fired the top security officials responsible for benghazi and the government issued an ultimatum to melissas across the country, disarm and disband in 48 hours or face the consequences. as many as ten major armed groups complied. melissas and extremists remain a significant problem in libya, but there is an effort to address it that has now taken hold throughout the country. as libya grapples with the challenges of forming a government the international community needs to support its efforts to bring these militias to heal and provide security for all of its citizens. consider tunisia, the birthplace of the arab revolution. last year and islamist party won a plurality of the votes in an open, competitive election. some in washington took this as an omen of doom but these new leaders formed a coalition with secular parties, and promised to uphold universal rights and freedoms including 4 women. the united states made it clear we would be watching closely and would assess the government by its actions, not its words. this past february, students and civil society activists shared with me their fears about extremists seeking to derail their transition and lasting democracy but also their hope that responsible leaders and accountable institutions would be strong enough and willing enough to turn back that challenge and indeed we have seen an intense debate play out in tunisian society. for example, early drafts of the new constitution labels women as complementary to men, but to nietzsche's active civil society raised strong objections and eventually the national constituent assembly amended to recognize women's equality. society is wise to remain vigilant and exercise their hard-earned rights to safeguard their new democracy. like the hundreds of tunisian women who recently took to the streets to protest on behalf of a woman charged with indecency after she was raped by a police officer. these competing visions of tunisia's future were put to the test. violent extremists attacked the u.s. embassy and burned the american school nearby. how do tunisian people and governments respond? first the government increased security around our embassy and promised to assist with repairs to the school which they have done. then they publicly committed to confront violent groups and prevent tunisia from becoming a safe haven for international terrorism. following through on these pledges is essentials. those responsible for the attacks must be brought to justice. the government must provide security for diplomatic missions and create a secure environment for foreign residents and visitors, and the rule of law must extend to everyone throughout the country. the country's leaders also took to the airwaves, newspaper pages and even facebook and twitter to denounce both the attacks and the extremist ideology behind them, putting their own political capital on the line. the foreign minister flew to washington to stand with me and publicly condemn the violence. and so we continue to support those changes that are occurring in libya and tunisia and those leaders and citizens who understand what is expected of them if they are to fulfil their own hope. the situation in the rest of the maghreb is different. morocco and algeria have not experienced revolution, but recent events have tested their values and resolve. last year when citizens of morocco called for change, moroccan society under king muhammed vi answered with major constitutional reform followed by early elections and expanded authority for parliament. and islamist party leads the new ruling coalition, along with a variety of other parties. after 13 years in the opposition. we have been encouraged that feeders sought to engage all moroccans and focus on creating jobs and fighting corruption and we continue to urge them to follow through on their commitments for political and economic reform. last month with anti-american protesters in the streets across the cities of morocco the foreign minister travelled to washington for our first-ever strategic dialogue. he could have avoided the cameras but instead strongly condemned the attack in benghazi, embraced a broader partnership with the united states and pledged that his country would continue working towards democracy and the rule of law. algeria also has much to gain by embracing the changes taking place around it and we have seen some progress. the government held parliamentary elections in may and invited international observers to monitor them for the first time. it moved quickly last month to protect diplomatic missions including the u.s. embassy and to defuse tensions in the streets. but still algeria has a lot of work to do. up hold universal rights and create space for civil society, a message i delivered at the highest level in person in february. what do these snapshots and stories from across the region tell us? on the one hand, last month, strains of extremism that threaten those nations as well as the broader region and even the united states. on the other hand we have seen actions that would have been hard to imagine a few years ago. democratically elected leaders and free people in arab countries standing up for a peaceful pluralist future. it is wade too soon to say how these transitions will play out. but what is not in doubt is that america has a big stake in the outcome. last month at the united nations general assembly in new york i met with leaders from across the region and i told each of them that the united states will pursue a strategy to support emerging democracies as they work to provide effective security grounded in the rule of law for economic growth and bolster democratic institutions. we have made those three priorities the hallmark of america's involvement in the region. we have convened donor conferences to coordinate assistance, leverage new partnerships to the g-8, a community of democracy, the o a cd and stepped up engage in with the arab league signing the first-ever memorandum of understanding for strategic dialogue between them. but we recognize that words whether they come from us or others are cheap. we talk about investing in responsible leaders and accountable democratic institutions have to be followed by actual investment. so we have mobilized more than $1 billion in targeted assistance since the start of the revolution. the obama administration has requested from congress a new $770 million fund that would be tied to concrete benchmarks for political and economic reform. and i again urge congress to move forward on this priority for. but let me briefly address the 3 parts of our strategy starting with security. the recent riots and lawlessness underscore the challenge of safeguarding public safety in free society and reforming security forces. for decades those forces protected regimes. now there job is to protect citizens, especially against the threat from violent extremists. for some time al qaeda and the islamic maghreb and other terrorist groups have launched attacks and kidnappings from northern mali into neighboring countries. now with the chaos and ethnic conflict allowing these groups to carve out a larger safe-haven, seeking to extend their reach and their network in multiple directions. we are using every tool we can to help our partners fight extremism and meet their security challenges. we recently embedded additional foreign service officers with regional expertise into the u
PBS
Oct 5, 2012 11:00pm PDT
. >> they're two of the most well-recognized journalists in the united states. pioneers and advocates. for more than two decades maria and george have informed million of hispanics through the popular evening newscast. their brand of journalism is characterized not only by subjective and perspectives, but also by a high degree of social advocacy. in the last three decades both have covered a wide range of news and have witnessed history in the making. >> mexico, oh, yes. >> from presidential elections around the world to the most destructive natural disasters. maria has interviewed dictators, revolutionaries, world leaders, heads of state in latin america, and in the united states. she was among the first female journalists to report from the war torn streets of baghdad. george has covered five wars and right after the terrorists attack on september 11th he drove all the way from miami to new york to report on the tragedy firsthand. once he even asked for a vacation to cover the war in afghanistan. an assignment that at the time the network deemed too dangerous. he's had very public encoun
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 11:00pm EDT
the united states maintain, deployment all over the world and maintain military capacity to go into many regions of the world and defeat regional adversaries, maintain diplomatic influence and presence to be able to resolve many crises in the world, in short, it has the u.s. as the basic world solution to many problems, and my argument is that that posture is becoming insolvent, for a variety of reasons, not only are domestic economic problems that are making our current level of defense expenditures unsustainable but also transit world politics that are leading to a world of increasingly assertive emerging powers that definitely still want american leadership, but are yes, sir and, less and less tolerant of a world in which america dictates the outcome of problems so for those and other reasons i think that the default paradigm we have relied on is becoming unsustainable and we need to begin a dialogue about new options, new concepts that would underwrite a more sustainable vision for u.s. leadership going forward. >> rose: okay. having said that, david, ignatius, what was it that
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2012 11:00pm EDT
refusal to accept the right of a sovereign state, a member of the united nations as a viable state, a state which is legitimate, is unacceptable from any point of view. from any aspect and angle whatsoever. we cannot accept the iranians will be allowed to legitimize another state whatever it is. and certainly not from our point of view not israel. they will have swallow two bitter pills not one. one pill will be the pill of the threat nuclear threat and the other will be the threat of accepting israel right to exist. despite the rhetoric we are hearing from teheran, i believe that many iranians in places of power understand that israel is here to stay. they realize that israel not going disappear as it will not disappear. and therefore, they will have to come terms with this reality. and these two elements means to say in order to achieve the aim, you have to find ways of giving them what did i say a few minutes ago? to resort to the use of dignity. it's a different good thing to do. it's very difficult. i'm not saying it's going to be easy. i think it's something we have to do. becau
SFGTV2
Oct 22, 2012 3:00pm PDT
number one. united states is richer on a per capita basis by a magnitude of about tenfold, but china will have more economic output than the united states. it is a force that has to be reckoned with. they got this way because they have had very good growth for a number of years, but it is growing a little bit too strong. there are some small bubbles popping up in different parts of their economy, and they are trying to slow down the economy. slowing down an economy -- every government can do that. the hard part is controlling that downward trajectory. in most cases, countries that tried to slow down their economy -- they go into a crash, they go into a recession, but china is different. the best way i have to describe china's economy, to steal a line from yogi berra is one-half market economy and three- quarters centralize control economy. they are big enough. they are powerful enough that they can probably pull this off. we will have to see how it happens, but that is an important thing for the world economy. europe, on the other hand, is another story. if you believe in the m
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 2:00pm EDT
ambassador, the syrian ambassador of the united states the time called me a pen was also a friend and academic in the past, computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said david, it's on. i'd forgotten about this will mean. i said what is on? he said well, the president was to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and june of that you're extensively. i interviewed his wife in many other syrian officials. >> host: what was the first baby might? >> well, after the pleasantries and after i explained why wanted to do those, my first substantive substantive sentence to him was mr. president, you know i'm not in politics for s-sierra. you know i'm going to read this but can criticize you. he said that's fine. i know you'll criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know in the past you criticized my father's policy, but you are always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him, you know, mr. president, one of the worst things you ever did? with that? said he let it be known that you like phil collins music, the rockstar
NBC
Oct 28, 2012 11:30am EDT
weariness in america but what it's level of responsibility that the united states feels should any of these things go south, in terms of what we've tried to create in terms of stable governments? >> i think what you saw in the debates that was governor romney and president obama both understand the american people are sick and tired of these wars. they are sorry they ever heard of the place called the middle east. they just want out. and so the question is how do you, to the degree you can, shape the environment after you get out? and i think that's what all of this talk about 2014 in afghanistan is, to focus the minds of afghan leaders. we are not going to be around. and i actually think iraq has gone better than i expected. so, who knows. afghanistan might too. i'm actually though in the long run, more pessimistic about afghanistan than i am about iraq. >> start by why do you think iraq has gone better than expected and then michael will talk about where you think there's gaps in this path's approach to t. >> i thought that iraq would unravel after the americans left. in fact, aid s
WETA
Oct 24, 2012 12:00pm EDT
only the united states really, can really, can really do that today or has the will to do that in the capacity and industry talked to many people in the private sector who really are enthused about becoming more closer with our public policy, to shape the future overseas and benefit our economy as well. >> rose: before i go to david and michael, you have argued before that the united states, help me understand exactly the words you would use, but principally coming out of iraq, lost its credibility with the rest of the world, lost its admiration from the rest of the world? >> yes, i would use the word legitimacy. i thought much of the world thought america's engagement in the world in the traditional word here is leadership was legitimate because it stood in a wider sense for the collective interests and not just our own. i think the fact that we fought a war on the basis of such falsified justification without real good case that it was either in our national interests or anybody else's national interest i think has discredited the united states. but i continue to think that the
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 1:00pm EDT
received asylum in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the
FOX News
Oct 12, 2012 3:00pm EDT
three other americans and marked the first assassination of a sitting united states ambassador in almost three decades. wendell has the news from the white house. republican complaints involved more than inadequate security at the consulate. >>reporter: they accusing the administration of misleading the public for a week by suggesting the attack grew from a protest against an anti-islam film made in this country. that film triggered protests in other arab countries including in cairo earlier on september 11th. in the debate last night, republican challenger paul ryan suggested the president blamed the film for the embassy attack. in a speech at the united nations, two weeks later, he blamed them. >> he went to the u.n. and said six times talked about the youtube video. look, if we hit by terrorists we will call it for what it is: a terrorist attack. our ambassador in paris has a marine detachment regarding him. shouldn't we have one regarding our ambassador in benghazi? >> there is a marine detachment at embassy in tripoli but not the consulate where ambassador stevens was killed. >>trac
PBS
Oct 23, 2012 11:00pm PDT
yorker magazine who has a remarkable story about death in iraq and reunion in the united states. >> the i interviewed a guy in the peace, a psychiatrist who used the term moral injury and he sa a t of soiers a marines stuff from moral injury, which he described as sort of it happens when you get an order, you do something that you believe at the time was absolutely correct and the only thing you could do, and it turns out to have been, to have terrible consequences. that is basically what happened here. >> rose: american foreign policy and a dexter filkins story. when we come back. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. additional funding provided by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with the 2012 election last night, president obama and mitt romney balanced it out in the third and final debate. at lynn university in boca raton florida, the suggest was foreign policy but discussion often veered toward domestic concerns as well, the two men addressed a r
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 7:45pm EDT
to the united states and deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north korean. cannot possible read the bock without being moved to tears in just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible they go in to greater detail on some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, whom jay will introduce her shortly using the best of the journalist sensibility honed at nearly three decades at the "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of north korea. we are deeply proud of her and we look forward to her comments today. copies of the escape from north korea are available for purchase at the event for $20 and melanie kirkpatrick will be glad to sign your copy. it's available online at amazon.com. i urge all of you to read it and discuss it and tread again. i ?row the special pleasure of introducing my friend jay. he's a senior partner at kirk land and ellis here in new york city. he's a well known commodity in the washington policy world having served with the distinction in two different administration as cabinet secretary under president george h. w.
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2012 11:00pm EDT
we had. france looks a lot more like the united states, frankly. the western hat name in the last decade is also true you do see it. i haven't done this kind of analysis because as data aren't available to me for other countries. but all the normal indicators of how well those economies are performing say that they've been underperforming in much the same way the united states has been underperforming for the last decade, which it can lends credence to the notion that the this is about is globalization and information technology in the ship and the relative value of intangible assets is tangible assets. >> isn't the real point of difference in the health care you are making quick >> there is a big difference in health care. you're right. [inaudible] >> mind this kind of two-pronged two-pronged -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, on the question of women's earnings, yes, the fact that women are the primary caretakers of children in society as compared to their husbands and a lot of women with children don't have husbands, is certainly a factor. and i felt the biggest fa
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2012 5:00pm EDT
if senior clark comes up here because either the president of the united states or i am without a seat. [laughter] i have no intention of standing. [laughter] >> i must say i have traveled to banquet circuits for years. i never understood the logistics of dinners like this and how the absence of one individual could cause three of us not to have seats. [laughter] >> vice president, i'm glad to see you here tonight. you said you want to give america back to the little guy. [laughter] mr. president, i am that man. [laughter] >> as i looked out at the ties this evening, i realize i have not seen so many people so well-dressed since i went to a come-as-you-are party. >> a lot of good news from yugoslavia, there's one less name for me to remember. [laughter] [applause] >> you know what this world really needs? it really needs more world leaders named al smith. [laughter] >> it is an honor to share the dias with a descendent of al smith. your great grandfather was my favorite kind of governor. [laughter] the kind who ran for president and lost. [laughter] >> all of that al smith program
SFGTV2
Oct 21, 2012 7:00am PDT
probably the most accessful base conversion in the united states. if you haven't been to the presidio, i think you should try and make that. if you're from out of town, it's a spectacular transition there. so, these golden gate national parks that i happen to be the superintendent of has now become after 40 years the second most visited national park in our country. we get 14 million people a year that come to our parks. it has spectacular coastline, includes muir wood, alcatraz, we get to tell the stories, stories about essentially what you and your predecessors did this this area. our headquarters, fort mason, was the fisherman's wharf area was the port of embarkation for the wars in the pacific. just this week we brought in a world war ii 16-inch bottle ship gun to the marine head lands to put it up at battery townsly which would have been the pinnacle of coastal artillery in world war ii. so, we now have a canon or artillery collection that spans in our park that spans from the civil war to the cold war, including a preserve 19-missile base. some of you also know that during the 1
CSPAN
Oct 2, 2012 6:00am EDT
united states senate. they have said enough spending, enough in debt and enough taxes on the middle-class. we have made changes here in the state of nebraska that grows this economy. that is why i am running for the united states senate. they want a change of leadership in washington. we have a senate in washington that hasn't passed a budget, let alone a balanced budget. we can change that. that is why i am running for the united states senate. i want to pass a balanced budget. i'm not your usual politician. obviously i am not one of the good ole boys, and i will make the tough decisions in the united states senate. we'll roll up my sleeves and work hard for you, and i will fight for you. i will fight for all people. thank you. >> thank you. now the opening statement from former nebraska governor and senator bob kerrey. >> i love nebraska. i was born here in lincoln. i went to lincoln northeast high school. i left nebraska, went to war and came home. i recovered from my injuries here in lincoln. i started a business that today employs more than 700 people. i have served you as your
CSPAN
Oct 14, 2012 8:15am EDT
activities. he spends three years in jail before returning to the united states in deciding to dedicate his entire life to saving north koreans. you cannot possibly read this book without being profoundly moved without frankly been moved to tears and just about every single chapter. and the stories are incredible. we will go into greater detail in some of these momentarily. melanie kirkpatrick, i'm jay lefkowitz will introduce shortly uses the best of her journalist sensibilities honed in three decades at "the wall street journal" to highlight the human side of the tragedy of north korea and we are deeply proud and we look forward to her comments today. copies of "escape from north korea" are available for purchase at today's event for $20 melanie curt -- it would be glad to send your copy. it's also available at amazon.com. buy your shallow view another online booksellers to read it, discuss it and read it again. i now have a special pleasure of introducing my friend, jay lefkowitz. shea is a senior partner at kirkland and alice here in new york city. jay is a well-known commodity in the w
CBS
Oct 14, 2012 5:00am PDT
are there in the united states? >> that's very hard. you so take attendance everyday. but we estimate about 58,000. something in that area. >> 58,000. and one of the things that we're here to -- dr. snider is going to help us with is there are conversations and images of sisters of nuns how have we seen them? what are the roles today? and internationally what are the questions they're engaged in within the catholic church. stay with us. we'll be right back. ,,,, . >> dr. sandra snyder of the jesuit school in berkeley. a joy to have you. we're going to talk in this segment about religious life. the religious life really goes back to the first century. let's skip the first 17 centuries of that and take us to western europe and what happens with immigration of into the united states and how that affects the sisters and the images that people have. >> all right. go back a little bit further than that. in the 1600s, 1700s. so the first time -- actually a little bit before that. the sisters who were nuns who were cloistered who entered their religious communities did not come out.
CSPAN
Oct 6, 2012 11:50pm EDT
president of the united states. the candidates are senator dan quayle and lloyd bentsen, the democratic nominee. [applause] for the next 90 minutes, we will be questioning the candidates following a format designed and agreed to by representatives of the two campaigns. however, there are america rigid restrictions on the questions my colleagues and i may ask. the first question goes to senator quayle. you have to the minister responded. you have been criticized for your decision to stay out of the vietnam war, for your poor economic -- academic record. more troubling by some of the comments to have made in your own party. a separate -- secretary of the state said your peck was the dumbest mistake george bush could have made it. your leader added to the senate said a better qualified person could have been chosen. other republicans have been more critical in private. why do you think you have not made a more substantial impression on some of the people who have been able to observe the up close? >> the question goes to whether yes or qualified to be the vice- president. in the
CSPAN
Oct 23, 2012 6:00am EDT
once. now we change it to one conflict. the highest priority of the united states is to maintain the safety of the united states. i will not cut the military by $1 trillion. which is a combination of the budget cuts the president has as well as the sequestration cuts. in my view, that is making our future less certain at less secure. >> this is not something that i proposed. it is something that congress propose. it will not happen. the budget that we are talking about is not reducing our military spending, it is maintaining it. governor romney has not spent enough time looking at how our military works. you look at the navy for example. we also have fewer horses and bayonets. the nature of our military has changed. we have these things called aircraft carrier's warplanes plan of them. -- where planes land on them. we have shipside go underwater and nuclear submarines. this is not a game of battleship where we are counting ships. it is, what are our capabilities? when i sit down with the secretary of the navy and the joint chiefs of staff, we determine how we will meet our faith with
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 11:45pm EDT
judgment. and judgment is what we look for in the president of the united states of america. i'm proud that important military figures who are supporting me in this race, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff john shalikashvili, just yesterday, general eisenhower's son, general john eisenhower, endorsed me, general admiral william crown, general tony mcbeak, who ran the air force war so effectively for his father -- all believe i would make a stronger commander in chief. and they believe it because they know i would not take my eye off of the goal, osama bin laden. unfortunately, he escaped in the mountains of tora bora. we had him surrounded. but we didn't use american forces, the best trained in the world, to go kill him. the president relied on afghan warlords and he outsourced that job too. that's wrong. >> new question, two minutes, senator kerry." colossal misjudgments." what colossal misjudgments, in your opinion, has president bush made in these areas? >> well, where do you want me to begin? first of all, he made the misjudgment of saying to america that he was going to
CSPAN
Oct 7, 2012 6:00am EDT
mr. mondale's. they saved the life of the president of the united states. i thought that was a cheap shot telling the american people to try to divide class, rich and poor. but the big question, it isn't whether mrs. ferraro is doing well. i think they are depog pretty well. i know barbara and i are doing well. and it is darn sure mr. mondale is doing well with $1.4 million. but the question is, are the tax codes fair? the answer is, the rich are paying 6% more on taxes and the poor are getting a better break. they went to the ethics committee. they went to change the trust. the trust has been revealed. and i was sure glad to see that i had paid 42% of my gross income in taxes. >> are you really a texan? >> i am really a texan. i may have noted she has a new good accountant. i would like to get his name and phone number. i think i paid too much in the way of taxes. and residents, mr. boyd, legal residence for voting is very different. the domicile, they call it, very different than the house. they say you are living in the vice president's house. therefore you don't get -- i got prob
CSPAN
Oct 11, 2012 1:00am EDT
the united states government that you have any questions about, please come to this committee. we take the work of whistle- blowers and people who give testimony very seriously. you have been critical to bring out things which would not have -- which would not have come out to. i will close with two comments. that i took away from today. he did not produce security at -- you do not reduce security at the -- the same time as you are increasing hazardous duty pay. it does not make sense. i have not heard that question asked and answered. i only heard that it occurred. i think the state department to take away from today and understanding that that sends a message that says, we will pay you for the risk. we will not pay to have you made safer. that is the impression that anyone would get if you reduce the staffing below recommendations or request an increase the pay. i do not think the men and women who service overseas want. i know the compensation for hardship is important, but safety comes first. i have the marine fellow who works for me. on this side there. the united states military
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 7:00pm EDT
united states of america. i know i can do a better job in iraq. i have a plan to have a summit with all of the allies, something this president has not yet achieved, not yet been able to do to bring people to the table. we can do a better job of training the iraqi forces to defend themselves, and i know that we can do a better job of preparing for elections. all of these, and especially homeland security, which we'll talk about a little bit later. >> mr. president, you have a 90- second rebuttal. >> i, too, thank the university of miami, and say our prayers are with the good people of this state, who've suffered a lot. september the 11th changed how america must look at the world. and since that day, our nation has been on a multi-pronged strategy to keep our country safer. we pursued al qaida wherever al qaida tries to hide. seventy-five percent of known al qaida leaders have been brought to justice. the rest of them know we're after them. we've upheld the doctrine that said if you harbor a terrorist, you're equally as guilty as the terrorist. and the taliban are no longer in power. te
CSPAN
Oct 22, 2012 10:30pm EDT
way. i ask for your vote. i would like to be the next president of the united states to help and support this next week in this great nation and to make sure we maintain america as the hope of the earth's protective so much. >> gentlemen, thank you so much. that brings an end to this year's debates in the want to thank lynn university and its students. i leave you with the words of my mom said, go vote. good night. >> thank you. >> thank you. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [applause] >> as we continue to watch the scene on the campus of lynn university, our phone lines are open. your reaction to this third and final debate. the focus, for policy. first up, rose, a supporter of mitt romney from nevada. good evening. ." >> i wanted to say something about the moderator. been one-sided, i think. i believe in governor romney and i hope people open their eyes and take notice of what's going on in our country. >> thank you for the call. on our twitter page, when you were saying -- and david, day
CSPAN
Oct 19, 2012 8:00pm EDT
my life to continue that work is your united states senator. >> moderator: thank you. we hope this debate has subfolders as they ponder their decision and a selection only urge you to vote on election day. what you think our candidates, chris murphy and linda mcmahon and our reporter panel, al terzi, dennis house, keisha grant and mark davis if i could have your attention,e program on manufacturing society in the 21st century here at the institute. i welcome you on behalf of the institute both in the audience and those viewing remotely. i wanted to ask our president, walter isaacson, just to say a few words. it's always dangerous when your boss knows as much or more about the subject matter. >> that is definitely not true and that is why it is a pleasure to have tom here at the aspen institute because the one thing we do know about the issue of manufacturing is how important it is to america's economy and how ridiculous it is to try to think of a great economy that doesn't always have a healthy manufacturing sector. and so, when we were looking at the aspen institute and all the th
CSPAN
Oct 9, 2012 9:00am EDT
us to invest in the united states and create jobs. >> we've got some good role models even though this roundtable -- business roundtable doesn't get involved and we don't even great legislators. my expense as a governor is a competitive state, our best teachers on political activist with the labor unions, and then later on george soros. he taught every wealthy individual american you can't afford to sit on the sidelines. and so i say go for it. >> we don't do endorsements either. we have a pack. we're very involved, and last week we launch a retail meets the vote campaign and will probably connect wit with a quar of a million retailers and millions of their employees. not endorsing, not to do that would give them voter guide, encouraging them to be in full. if we're going to address any of the issues, maybe we can get something done everything looks exactly the same. but there's a sense of people of a better understanding of our positions there's a greater likelihood we will get some action on them and that's why we've engaged our membership. >> let's go to questions from the audi
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 8:30pm EDT
president of the united states. you add those three elements together, and you get the obama hate machine. so i'd just like to say a little bit about each of those elements and open it up for questions until c-span tells us the cameras are turned off. and let's start at those directed against obama. i think criticism of obama -- [inaudible] and every day in front of the white house on pennsylvania avenue there's a crowd of people protesting something, you know? and i love that, i really do. i always make a point of checking out what they're there for, what the issue of the day is. it's a very healthy part of our democracy. and criticism of presidents, of course, has been around for a long time. if you want to go back to the ugliest presidential campaign in history, you could probably go back to 800 and john adams -- 1800 and john adams and thomas jefferson. particularly the followers against each other. so, um, but with president obama it's been attacks not on his policies so much as on him as a person. and we haven't seen that, i don't believe -- and i went back and did a lot of
CSPAN
Oct 20, 2012 6:00am EDT
united states. my oldest son. he just graduated. >> give them hell today. >> thanks for coming. we have a lot to be excited about today. we are here on a corner -- [inaudible] i know there are a lot of small business representatives and employees here today. for your efforts and hard work, give them a hand. [applause] president calvin coolage once remarked that the business of america is business. his words are as true today as they were when he said them nearly 100 years ago. small business drives our economy, fuels or communities and feeds our families. [applause] small businesses like ours represent 97.8% of all employers. we employ half of america's work force and create between 60 respect -- 60% and 80% of job growth in the country. we know how very important those jobs numbers are. i imagine you feel like i do. i need my job, and so do our employees. thankfully here at ball we have secure jobs. you will see trucks coming and going from a long hard day any minute now. i can't imagine the stress of being out of work and the anguish that would cause. unfortunately, 23 million of our
FOX News
Oct 21, 2012 3:30pm EDT
correspondent ed henry. >> since our founding the united states has been a nation that respects all faiths. we reject all efforts to denigrated religious beliefs of others. >> september 12th, he seems to embrace an idea that his aides will advance over the next two weeks that the ambassador and three other americans were killed in a spontaneous riot over an internet video. he does use the term terror but only in a general sense in context of the september 2001 terror attacks. >>. >> he gives an interview to 60 minutes shortly thereafter. he says nothing that has happened has made him second guess his policies since arab spring. >> i continued to be pretty certain there be bumps in the road. >> because nevada is battleground state. >> he leaves for a campaign trip to las vegas. >> the president of the united states did not postpone a campaign event even though we had been hit. >> i thought that was the biggest strategic mistake of the obama campaign. >> dana was press security in george bush's administration. she is now a fox news host. >> imagine if he would have said as commander in chief
CSPAN
Oct 25, 2012 12:00pm EDT
advantage and disadvantage to those other countries including the united states, that it is taking advantage of and finding ways around some of the rules and procedures that exist under the world trade organization and we have to use that mechanism but it doesn't deal with all issues. it isn't clear whether it deals with the currency question. it may be difficult to use wto mechanisms to address some of the things the chinese government is doing through the so-called state owned enterprises to give them an advantage and make it more difficult for outsiders to compete for a share of the market. the point i would make overall is we have to find ways to exert leverage, and we have to pursue an integrated strategy that deals with this full range of issues. i guess since i am thinking of it i have a third point that agrees with jeff to the extent it can be a multilateral effort because i think we share important interests with other and dealing on these issues. >> the final and concluding question tonight will be from garrey wong left teach for china sent to us by e-mail and the questio
CSPAN
Oct 18, 2012 8:00pm EDT
country and when they come home have great skills that we can put to use here in the united states and a third example the research and development tax credit. i helped shepherd through a credit that brings high-tech high-wage jobs to arizona. when each do that federally. those jobs right here to america. >> moderator: verna and how best to stick during the just arizona and america? parker: the first thing we should do is we should free the current tax rate. if we do that we will put $4000 in the pockets of middle-class americans. the second thing, we must become more competitive on the global scene. we can no longer have the highest corporate income tax in the world. right now we are in the high 30s and if we lower our corporate income tax to 22% we will create 2 million jobs here in america and also if we reinvest and make sure that the research and development tax credits extended by 25% another 2000 jobs. the next point is that i fully support building i 11 from las vegas to phoenix because that will create jobs and i would also advocate that we keep the air force base for that pro
CSPAN
Oct 8, 2012 5:00pm EDT
anyone who is running for the united states senate. you know very well by plan is my own. i have sought the expert opinions of those outside to get the brightest and the best and every word of that plan has been cited either in the online plan or in print. when you got into this race as the democrats at the thought -- as a democrat and you thought is going to be a coronation and now you are in a serious race with a serious woman. >> we're going to move on to the next question. >> in this tide of rising national debt, i was wondering about congressional earmarked. do you support elimination of them? here is one -- $1.9 million for a water taxi to pleasure beach in bridgeport. >> first call me respond to this last allegation. there is no doubt we'll look at her jobs plan, there are entire paragraphs and sentences lifted from the house republican website, from the cato institute. i don't know what you call it, but all i am saying is this is not a plan rooted in what best for the state of connecticut. this is a plan written by people in washington. when that mcmahon's idea that by si
CSPAN
Oct 12, 2012 5:00pm EDT
have a system in the united states, a labor intensive system that could employ a large number of dedicated professionals that can support people, support our young people who are not succeeding right now in making that transition from school to work, whether that be from college or high school. third, let's have an energy debate that is the find not by war but by and. there is scope for us to do more with renewals. yes, there is scope for us to do things with fossil fuels that are environmentally better and better in terms of national security because they don't involve dependence on foreign suppliers, of a kind that would have been unimaginable five years ago. and yes, there are still -- there is still substantial scope for increased energy efficiency and energy in efficiency is no less worth pursuing because we have found more natural gas. let's stop debating what the relative priority to attached to these measures are, and let's have our failures in the energy arianna after 50 years of talking, having to do too much rather than tried to do too little. as production comes, incr
FOX News
Oct 21, 2012 3:48pm EDT
go bad for obama. it's really bad to the united states because this is humiliation for the united states. it's bad for chris stevens and bad for sae9sdz smith and bad for tyrone woods. they are dead. they are gone. >> which brings us back to lieutenant colonel andrew wood who saw the deadly debacle coming. >> bret: i can tell you are emotional about it. the ambassador was killed, first one since 1979. he is your friend. >> it's a huge thing to have a loss like that. i grieve for his loss. i grieve for the loss that we suffer as our nation. it was our job to defend the compound. >> bret: benghazi attacks staggered america. we now have another reason to mourn on 9/11. a new unmistakable warning. islamic terrorists that brutalized our citizens were well armed killers intent on doing us great harm. the brave americans in libya knew that long before we died. the rest of us owe it on to them to under that, too. that is our program. i'm bret baier. thanks for watching. card gives you a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more [ russian accent ] rubles. eh, eheh, eh, eh. [ brooklyn a
FOX News
Oct 22, 2012 4:00am EDT
changed when terrorists murdered four americans at the united states consulate in benghazi on the anniversary of 9/11. americans had questions. who did this and how? should our government have seen it coming? did president obama tried to hide the truth? is this a huge scandal that exposes a failed obama foreign policy? is mitt romney just saying it is. tonight we'll try to give you answers. we'll walk you step by step through the terror of that day and break down the political maneuvering that has followed. we begin with a series of frightening developments and troubling decisions leading up to that horrific night. it's a story you haven't heard. it's told by a man who tried to prevent what happened on september 11th, 2012. >> did you have a close relationship with the ambassador? >> i lived and worked with him for two months when he came on to the time i left, yeah. >> bret: no one understands more the full extent the fiasco that killed stevens. he worked with him for six months before his violent death. 24-year special forces veteran, woods' job was try to prevent such an attack
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